#AnnaReadsThis, read it love it, recommended reading, what i'm reading

The Glass Castle + The House That Lars Built

You’ve read The Glass Castle, right? Right…? If not, you need to immediately. It’s everything anyone could ever ask for from a memoir — poignant, sad, thought-provoking, touching, insightful, hopeful…

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The House That Lars Built, one of my favorite design blogs, also hosts a bookclub & this month’s pick was The Glass Castle. They even created a beautiful prints & book marks you can download.

Have you seen the film version of the book that just hit theaters? I want to see it ASAP. It looks wonderful but intense, so I’ll have to wait until I’m in a more clear headspace. 😉

Happy reading & happy Monday!

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#AnnaReadsThis, brilliant reads, poetry, read it love it, recommended reading

National Poetry Month // 2017

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When I’ve found myself in moments of pure heartbreak — which is to say there have been many moments in my 27 years of existence — I have so often found solace in poetry. Last year, in the throes of a wee heartbreak, I loved this poem by Andrea Gibson.

Heck, I have even found myself brought to prose as a result of particular heartache — (see this poem) — I genuinely don’t even remember putting the words down. I just remember feeling utterly numb but in dire need to write. To put the feelings I wasn’t feeling down in words.

What I’m getting at, ironically, not so eloquently, is that poetry is powerful. It’s no secret that I’m a bonafide word-lover, so this too should come as no surprise. But even for those not so “into poetry”, I’d argue there’s a poem, poet, or poetry style for them. That’s the beautiful thing about poetry.

So, when I saw this list from The Strand Book Store of “11 Writers Bringing Poetry to Life,” you best believe my bank account took a hit.

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But I need even more! What are your favorite poets, poems, etc.? Let me know! I love it alllll. 

 

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feminism, instagram, october 2016, read it love it, recommended reading, social media, words from wise women

#WordsofWomen

I stumbled upon Words of Women one night during my nightly instagram perusing. I instantly fell in love with their feed. Then I learned they have a daily newsletter. Then I fell in love with finding a new article everyday in my email after lunch.

Because personally, I feel, the only way to be a peace with taking up space as an independent, 21st century woman, is to learn from those who came before me, and to fill my mind with words that carry us further.

Some of my favorite instagrams from W.o.W. //




Plus a few of my favorite articles… //

“A woman at a certain age who is unmarried, our society teaches her to see it as a deep personal failure. And a man, after a certain age isn’t married, we just think he hasn’t come around to making his pick.”

If Zelda Fitzgerald Was Crazy, What’s That Say About The Rest Of Us?

Zelda’s writing debut began with a review of her husband’s book The Beautiful and The Damned, in which she alluded to the fact that he got most of his material from her. This led to multiple offers to write for other magazines. Over the course of a 6 week stay at a psychiatric clinic, Zelda wrote an entire novel. When Scott read it, he viewed it as a semi-autobiographical account of their marriage and made her remove parts that drew on shared material he wished to use. The book would be published, yet who knows what missing parts could have brought the book to literary greatness.

Advice To Girls Starting High School (This Will Apply For The Rest Of Your Life)

The thing about high school is, you do learn a lot about the real world (even if it’s nothing like the real world). You learn what it’s like to be betrayed, lied to, confused and completely lost. You learn you can’t trust everyone and people who say are your friends can actually be the first to stab you in the back. You learn that the real world is a scary place and if you don’t start getting your act together, it’ll walk all over you. So whether you’re in high school, entering high school or can’t remember the name of you high school, these lessons will apply throughout your entire life.

And of course, sign up for their newsletter. I can say, without a doubt, this is the only newsletter I have ever be genuinely elated to receive daily.

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february 2016, Links of Love, march 2013, read it love it, recommended reading, singers, wise words, writers

No. 5

Only three years later… 😉

Dating is a minefield of opinions, philosophies, and personalities… and that’s just when it comes to what people are saying, not the actual dating itself. As someone with terrible anxiety and OCD, there are a million things that make dating emotionally exhausting just from my side. Add in the other party and the heaps of advice thrown my way on the regular, it’s enough to make me want to retreat to my Netflix nest forever, never to leave again. This piece by, Maris Kreizman (the same author of Slaughterhouse 90210), was an interesting take on changing yourself for love and whether or not it’s all really just a matter of luck.

And one of the most dismal parts of experiencing this kind of longing is that I was the victim of a certain brand of single lady concern trolling disguised as friendly advice. Everyone had words of wisdom (often unsolicited!) about how I should fix myself, as singled was an ailment for which I could find a cure if only I tried hard enough and took the appropriate steps to get healthy. 

I’ve been realizing more and more the importance of having a strong tribe of women with whom you feel you belong. I don’t know why exactly it took me so long to recognize the strength that comes with such support  in life, but I’m glad that I finally have. It’s incredible to me that so many of those friends with whom I connect the most have been friends I’ve made through this blog. Some of whom I’ve yet to meet in person. But among those I call my closest friends nonetheless. That’s why I especially loved this piece from Femsplain.

What do you do when you feel like you’ve lost yourself? Be with the person who can put you back together again, who knows what’s broken but not how to fix it. Who reminds you that things are not always perfect, but they are not meant to be. 

On the topic of anxiety, this piece from Artparasites really spoke to me.

Most of all, please don’t give up on me. Even though I even drive myself insane and get frustrated with myself sometimes, I hope you don’t. I hope you can still love me more each day and not resent me for a mental disorder I never wanted.

Jealousy rears its ugly head more often then not these days for me. Maybe it’s social media envy. Maybe it comes with your twenties. Whatever it is, I don’t like who it makes me. And I don’t like how quickly it can eat away at my heart. But it’s there. And when something is there pulling at you from all directions, it’s best to try and understand the cause before you can understand the cure. That’s where this brilliant TED talk comes in. It made me feel less alone. Less guilty. But hopeful.

When we feel jealous, we tell ourselves a story. We tell ourselves a story about other peoples’ lives, and these stories make us feel terrible because they’re designed to make us feel terrible. As the teller of the tale and the audience, we know just what details to include, to dig that knife in. Jealousy makes us all amateur novelists.

And lastly, from Madame Clairvoyant herself, a horoscope that is relevant always, to everyone.

Sometimes it can be easy to feel that you’re less than you are, rather than accept the huge challenge of living your fullest, truest life. Sometimes it can be easier not to want anything at all, rather than accept the deep ache of desire in your bones. It can be easier to deny your real self, demanding and golden and made of so many things. Try, this week, just to sit with the knowledge of who you really are and what you really need. Don’t tell yourself, not even once, to accept anything less than this.

xo-

 

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books, brilliant reads, life lesson, read it love it, recommended reading, the book thief

Recommended Read: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

I read this book, The Book Thief, when I was au pairing in Germany. We were driving from Northern Germany to Venice, Italy, and I read as we zoomed through the alps, while the children dozed in and out of sleep. I’d flip through the pages in between passing out various snacks to pacify the inevitable hunger that strikes when you are bored, and four, and on a road trip. It was the perfect book, for the perfect time in my life. It’s a remarkable story that touches on themes of life both from the time period and setting in which the book is set, WWII Europe, as well as the world today. I highly recommend it, and without giving to much away, have compiled a few of my favorite quotes below. (Tonight I’m finally watching the movie version… I’ll let you know if it lives up to the book! Fingers-crossed.)

“When she came to write her story, she would wonder when the books and the words started to mean not just something, but everything.” 

“I like that every page in every book can have a gem on it. It’s probably what I love most about writing–that words can be used in a way that’s like a child playing in a sandpit, rearranging things, swapping them around. They’re the best moments in a day of writing — when an image appears that you didn’t know would be there when you started work in the morning.” 

“The best word shakers were the ones who understood the true power of words. They were the ones who could climb the highest. One such word shaker was a small, skinny girl. She was renowned as the best word shaker of her region because she knew how powerless a person could be WITHOUT words.” 

“When she came to write her story, she would wonder when the books and the words started to mean not just something, but everything.” 

“I have to say that although it broke my heart, I was, and still am, glad I was there.” 

“She took a step and didn’t want to take any more, but she did.” 

“I want words at my funeral. But I guess that means you need life in your life.”  

“I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race – that rarely do I even simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant…I AM HAUNTED BY HUMANS.” 

“The point is, it didn’t really matter what the book was about. It was what it meant that was important.”  

“Even now, I wonder how much of my life is convinced.” 

“I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.” 

“She was a girl with a mountain to climb.” 

“At first, she could not talk. Perhaps it was the sudden bumpiness of love she felt for him. Or had she always loved him?” 

“If only she could be so oblivious again, to feel such love without knowing it, mistaking it for laughter and bread with only the scent of jam spread on top of it. It was the best time of her life.” 

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